Plane Technique

Plane Technique

Using a hand plane on the ends of boards can be tricky. One way to keep from splitting a board at the edges is to push the hand plane so the blade goes only to the middle of the board. Then repeat the process from the other direction. To avoid dipping, try to put...
Plane Technique

Surface Drag

If any of your woodworking tools seem to be losing their zip, make sure they aren’t suffering from surface drag instead of a dull blade. Rubbing a thin coat of paste wax or paraffin on the top surfaces of tools like tablesaws, planers or jointers, or onto the...
Plane Technique

Clamp Pads

Professional woodworkers often don’t use pads on their clamps because they know how to set them up without marring the wood. But if you prefer to use them for pipe or bar clamps, you can buy some or make up your own. Scrap rubber, shoe soles, even old mud flaps,...
Plane Technique

Planer-Joiner

Professional woodworkers buy quality tools capable of precision adjustments. Two tools which give them a leg up are the thinckness planer and planer/joiner. If you don’t have these tools to help make sure your stock is perfectly dimensioned, try to find someone...
Plane Technique

Workbench Height

When setting up workbenches, the height is generally figured at about hip pocket high. But before you buy or build a workbench, consider the height of your tablesaw. If the bench is the same height as the saw it can then be used for extra support when sawing over-size...
Plane Technique

Tape Check

If you are working on a project with a partner and using two different measuring tapes, take the time to check that both tapes are in synch. Sometimes if the hook end of an older tape happens to get bent, it may throw off the measurement as much as a sixteenth of an...