Deck Nailing

Deck Nailing

When building a deck, always nail a thinner member to a thicker member. Hot-dipped zinc-coated nails are a good choice. For more holding power, consider using either ring- or spiral-shanked nails, or go with deck screws. If using screws, it’s best to pre-drill...
Deck Nailing

Toenailing

Toenailing styles can vary. Some pros like to drive three or four nails into a stud, toenailing from both sides at about a 30-degree angle. The job is easier if you first drive a holding nail on one side of the stud, then drive two nails on the opposite side. Remove...
Deck Nailing

Bent Nails

Bent nails often result from poor hammering technique. However, they can also be caused by a dirty hammer face, especially when using cement-coated nails or working around adhesives. If you have problems, occasionally run a piece of fine sandpaper or emery cloth over...
Deck Nailing

Choosing A Drill

Power drills come in 3 sizes; 1/4, 3/8, and 1/2-in. Size refers to the largest capacity of bit that will fit in the drill’s chuck. 3/8-in. drills are the most versatile. They’re powerful, yet light enough to easily hold and manage. Larger bits can drill...
Deck Nailing

Drill Bit Cases

When you buy a drill bit set, it most likely will come in a storage case. This case will help you figure out which size bit you need to use. When drilling holes for a pilot or lead hole for a nail, find which slot in the bit case the nail will fit in. The next size...
Deck Nailing

Wood Splits

To reduce wood splits, such as when building a deck, first drill pilot holes for the nails using a drill bit size about three-quarters the diameter of the nail. In a pinch, if you don’t have a bit you can chuck in one of the nails being used. Blunting the nail...