Stove Pipe Fasteners

Stove Pipe Fasteners

Black stove pipe (and furnace pipe, for that matter) should be securely fastened together at each joint with no less than three sheet metal screws or pop-rivets. Stove and vent pipe should be inspected at least yearly, and replaced when signs of rusting or wear are...
Stove Pipe Fasteners

Catalytic Combuster

If you have a newer EPA-rated woodstove, you might have a catalytic combuster in there somewhere. Make sure to check the owner’s manual about cleaning it – and stick to the schedule. Combusters should last 5 or 6 years, but a clogged or dirty one will fail...
Stove Pipe Fasteners

Woodstove Glass

Dirty woodstove glass? Try dipping a dampened piece of newsprint in the fine white ashes after your fire has died. Whipe it onto the glass in circular motions – it works well if the glass isn’t terribly dirty to begin with.
Stove Pipe Fasteners

Buying Firewood

Although there are a variety of measuring units, firewood is normally sold by the cord, or a fraction of a cord. The dimensions of a “standard cord” is a stack of wood piled 8 feet long, 4 feet wide and 4 feet high. You won’t get a full 128 cubic...
Stove Pipe Fasteners

Seasoned Wood

When wood is stacked outdoors with good air circulation in a spot that’s dry, sunny and open for about six months it will be dry enough to support efficient combustion. Seasoned wood has a higher heating value than green wood. In general, because of its moisture...
Stove Pipe Fasteners

Good Wood

In either a wood stove or fireplace, the easiest and best fire is built by using a mixture of both softwoods–from trees such as pines and firs–and hardwoods, such as oak, eucalyptus, cedar and so on. Softwoods start burning easily, and the hardwoods provide for long...