Cultivating Annuals

Cultivating Annuals

Cultivate by hoeing to break up soil crusts and control weeds. Shallow rooted annuals are injured by deep, vigorous cultivation. Hoeing should be very shallow to cut weeds off just below the soil surface. As the annuals fill in, hand weeding may be the only practical...
Cultivating Annuals

Lead in Soil

Lead in soil can be a hazard when children play in bare soil or when people bring soil into the house on their shoes. The following two federal standards have been set for lead hazards in residential soil: 400 parts per million (ppm) and higher in play areas of bare...
Cultivating Annuals

Hardening Off

Before placing young plants in the garden they should be hardened off. Plants taken directly from the house to the garden almost always scorch from exposure to direct sunlight and wind. Scorched plants turn white or brown. Plants not killed will certainly be set back....
Cultivating Annuals

Insect Check

Want to check for surface feeding insects? Cut out both ends of a coffee can, screw it into the suspected area of infestation, fill it with water and a tablespoon of dish washing soap. As the water soaks into the soil the insects will float to the top.
Cultivating Annuals

Pesticide Alternatives

When used incorrectly, pesticides can pollute water. They also kill beneficial as well as harmful insects. Natural alternatives prevent both of these events from occurring and save you money. Consider using natural alternatives for chemical pesticides: Non-detergent...
Cultivating Annuals

Annuals vs. Perennials

Annuals complete their life cycle in one growing season. Seed germinates in the spring, the plant grows, flowers, produces seed and then dies. Perennials live for more than one growing season. There are two types of perennials. Herbaceous perennials generally die to...