Naturalizing Bulbs

Naturalizing Bulbs

Naturalizing simply refers to a way of planting bulbs so they appear as though Mother Nature had done the planting. That is, instead of planting in evenly spaced rows, the bulbs are planted in large drifts, much as you would find plants in nature. One way to achieve...
Naturalizing Bulbs

House Plant Insects

nsects can live in house plant soil. The most common of these is the fungus gnat. The adult lays eggs that produce small white maggots. The maggots eat fungi growing on the organic matter in the soil but they can feed on the roots. The insect is most likely to be a...
Naturalizing Bulbs

Which End Up

Most bulbs, including tulips and daffodils, should be planted with the pointed end up-this is where the leaves will emerge. Small, round bulbs can be planted in any direction. If in doubt, plant bulbs on their sides. This will make it easier for the leaves to grow up...
Naturalizing Bulbs

Dividing Hardy Bulbs

Crowded bulbs, or those producing fewer or smaller blooms than normal probably need to be divided. Do not dig the bulbs until after the foliage has yellowed. Diseased or wormy bulbs should be thrown out. Very small bulbs may not bloom for one or two years so. After...