Compost Aeration

Compost Aeration

The microorganisms in the compost pile function best when the materials are as damp as a wrung-out sponge and have many air passages. Extremes of sun or rain can adversely affect the balance of air and moisture in your pile. The air in the pile is usually used up...
Compost Aeration

Removing Perennials

Removal of old flowers prolongs the blooming period, reduces self seeding which leads to volunteer plants, and promotes flowering on side shoots. Cut off spent flower spikes just below the lowest floret. To be effective, removal must be done soon after the flowers...
Compost Aeration

Compost Volume

Compost piles trap heat generated by the activity of millions of microorganisms. A 3-foot by 3-foot by 3-foot compost pile is considered a minimum size for hot, fast composting. Piles wider or taller than 5 feet don’t allow enough air to reach the microorganisms...
Compost Aeration

Insect Check

Want to check for surface feeding insects? Cut out both ends of a coffee can, screw it into the suspected area of infestation, fill it with water and a tablespoon of dish washing soap. As the water soaks into the soil the insects will float to the top.
Compost Aeration

Mulching Bulb Beds

Wait until the ground has begun to freeze before mulching bulb beds. Mulching earlier will encourage bulb-munching rodents like mice and voles to nest there. A 3- to 4-inch layer of mulch will help prevent freeze-thaw cycles that can heave bulbs out of the ground;...