Painting

Cleaning Solvent

Cleaning Solvent

Use the right solvent to clean up paint equipment. Check the paint can label. Generally use a mild detergent solution for water-based paints, mineral spirits for alkyd enamels, mineral spirits or turpentine for oil paints, alcohol for shellac, and mineral spirits for varnish. When you are reusing solvent for cleaning equipment, occasionally rub some between your fingers. When it begins to feel sticky, dispose of properly.

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Cleaning Solvent

Lead Dust

Lead dust can form when lead-based paint is dry scraped, dry sanded, or heated. Dust also forms when painted surfaces bump or rub together. Lead chips and dust can get on surfaces and objects that people touch. Settled lead dust can re-enter the air when people vacuum, sweep, or walk through it.

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Cleaning Solvent

Painting With Pads

When using a paint pad, apply the paint with long, straight strokes, all in the same direction. Do not pull the pad back over the painted area. Also, be aware that paint pads have a tendency to leave lap marks if you do not feather the paint carefully where one stroke meets another.

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Cleaning Solvent

Paint Stirring

When painting from a paint can, give it a half turn periodically throughout the job. Dipping the brush into the can alternately on one side of the can and then the other automatically keeps the contents stirred at the surface and prevents a surface film from forming. Also occasionally sweep the tip of the brush back and forth through the paint, especially with a fast-drying latex.

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Cleaning Solvent

Painting Over Paper

It is always a temptation to take short cuts. You may choose to paint over wallpaper either because you don’t want to take the time to remove it, or perhaps the paper hides cracks and defects in the walls of your older home. Most professionals will suggest that you remove the paper because it may peel or the wall covering texture will be difficult to paint over.

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Cleaning Solvent

Stripping Ventilation

Use paint strippers outdoors if possible. If you must use them indoors, cross-ventilate by opening all doors and windows. Make sure there is fresh air movement throughout the room. Ventilate the area before, during, and after applying and stripping. Never use any paint stripper in a poorly ventilated area. If work must be done indoors under low ventilation conditions, consider having the work done professionally instead of attempting it yourself.

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Cleaning Solvent

No-Lump Paint

If you find lumps in a can of paint that you need, you can “push” them out. Cut out a circle from a piece of wire screen slightly smaller than the can’s inside circumference. Put the screen circle on the surface of the paint. With a little help it will sink to the bottom of the can, taking the lumps with it. Another way to salvage lumpy paint is to strain it through an old nylon stocking.

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Cleaning Solvent

Paint Now, Save Later

Like tile, most paint will differ slightly in each lot produced. If you plan to use the same color thoughout your house, it’s a good idea to purchase as much paint as you can at one time. This will avoid any deviations in the paint color and save you an extra trip to the store.

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