Joint Sizing

Joint Sizing

Glue will soak more into the end grain of wood and can potentially result in starved glue joints. To help prevent this, you can “size” any end grain to be glued with a mixture of glue diluted with water. Dilute just so that when it is applied, glue drops...
Joint Sizing

Less Expensive Glue

You can cut the cost of wood glue for workshop projects significantly by buying your glue in 1-qt. or larger containers. To make it convenient to use, transfer the glue as you need it from the large bottle to your own squeeze bottles or a glue pot.
Joint Sizing

Biscuit Joints

Using thin wood wafers called biscuits can strengthen wood joints by providing more glue bonding area. You can use a biscuit joiner (also called a plate joiner) to cut precision mating slots in boards for the biscuits, which are available in three sizes. Or, to save...
Joint Sizing

Loose Screws

One way to fix a loose screw in wood is to remove it and then insert toothpicks or burned wooden matches with a coating of wood glue into the hole. Allow the glue to cure, then cut flush and re-drive the screw. You can also insert a plastic wall anchor into the screw...
Joint Sizing

Drying Glue

Do you have any chairs, tables, or other wooden furniture that are a little wobbly due to the glue drying out? Here’s how you can tighten things up. First, disassemble the joined pieces. Clean off all of the old glue and dirt with warm vinegar. Rinse with clean...
Joint Sizing

Removing Glue

Warm vinegar will generally soften the most stubborn old glue on old furniture. Dipping the parts to be reglued in warm water, and then letting them dry out completely, will help to open up the wood pores and allow the new glue to enter the wood more freely. Warming...